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Good Morning Monday, Hello Cyber Attack

May 20, 2015


Drop in detected malware attacks in organisations coincides perfectly with weekends.

New research in the annual NTT 2015 Global Threat Intelligence Report shows a massive increase in malware detections on Monday mornings when users reconnect their devices to the corporate network. This trend supports the contention that the security perimeter in organisations is dissolving. This is because end users increasingly use their devices both inside and outside the corporate security perimeter. In fact, the user is today’s new organisation perimeter. What’s more, IT and security management can no longer count on well-defined network security perimeters to protect their organisations.

The Global Threat Intelligence Report contains analysis of over six billion security events worldwide gathered during 2014 by NTT Group companies including Dimension Data, Solutionary, NTT Com Security, NTT R&D, and NTT Innovation Institute (NTTi3).

Matthew Gyde, Dimension Data’s Group Executive - Security, says threats targeting end users are higher than ever. In addition, security vulnerabilities are mostly related to end-user systems and not servers. “It appears that successful exploits occurs over the weekend when end users - and their devices - are outside the security controls of the corporate network. This indicates that traditional security controls are effective at protecting the corporate network, however assets that transition between corporate and external access points are at greater risk.

Gyde says controls that address this trend must focus on the user and their devices, regardless of location, and points out that seven of the top 10 vulnerabilities identified were on end-user systems. End users

become a liability and that’s because their devices often have many unpatched vulnerabilities.”

According to Gyde, the malware industry is maturing, with malware becoming commoditised and available through dark net marketplaces. This means the barrier to entry for cybercriminals is a minimal financial investment, but for a potentially large return.